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Two Lessons in Racial Survival

by Dr. William L. Pierce (pictured)

THE LAST FIFTEEN YEARS have seen the re-emergence of academic studies which apply evolutionary theory to the understanding of human behavior. For the most part, interpretations derived from such studies have emphasized the importance of natural selection at the level of the individual or the gene, not the group. They have continued to conceptualize individuals as free agents, whose group membership is nothing more than an expression of self-interest and convenience.

Recently, however, developments in genetic science and population biology have enabled Darwinian biological theory to be extended logically to show that human society exists not as a collection of selfish individuals with selfish genes, but as a collection of selfish groups with selfish . . .

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The Inquiring Mind of Aldous Huxley

The Human Situation: Lectures at Santa Barbara, 1959, by Aldous Huxley, edited by Piero Ferrucci (Flamingo, paperback). reviewed by Nick Camerota BLOOD WILL TELL, says the old folk wisdom. Back in 1902, even the socialist H.G. Wells believed it. (In Anticipations, he held that the less advanced races, those “swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people,” who believe the world to be a charity institution, “will have to go.”) But this idea seems to have been washed away by the rising tide of color and by the present, unreasoning insistence that all men are somehow “equal.” However, a brief look at the Huxley family shows us there is more truth than poetry in the old saying. Aldous . . .

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Man and Technology

An albatross chick found on the beach of Midway Atoll that never grew to adulthood. Its parents accidentally fed it bits of plastic from the Pacific Ocean, and essentially choked it to death. by Dr. William L. Pierce TECHNOLOGY has come somewhat into bad odor among many of today’s young people. Sensitive souls who find themselves out of tune with the gaudy, gimmicky, and artificial world of 20th-century America often place the blame for this dissonance on the technology which has made all the gimmicks possible. This attitude is revealed, for example, by the pejorative use of the term “plastic.” DDT and Big Brother Hostility toward technology also often finds expression among those genuinely and deeply concerned about wildlife . . .

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